48 Marketing Trends found for Agencies / Creative


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New Survey Reveals Massive Agency-Client Disconnects

Trend Summary: A new survey of US marketers and ad agencies reveals little harmony and much discord.


Given the (often concealed) antipathy that exists between advertisers and agencies, few eyebrows will be raised on either side of the Atlantic at the findings of a recent survey conducted on behalf of the US Association of National Advertisers. Despite their differences, however, marketing and agency leaders agree that ...

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... agencies are valuable to marketers and help drive business results.

Nonetheless, the two sides differ as to how well they work together, the clarity of assignment briefs and the quality of the ad-approval process.

For example, only 27% of agency leaders polled think that marketers' briefs are clear and precise, whereas 58% of marketers believe their briefs to be cogent.

Likewise, just 36% of the agencies surveyed were satisfied with marketers ad-approval process, whereas 54% of marketers professed satisfaction with the process.

Predictably, however, the biggest disconnect between the two sides is the thorny issue of compensation.

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of clients described their agency compensation as fair, whereas only 40% of the agencies thought likewise.

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2015 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6575

Rift Grows Between Marketers and Ad Agencies

Trend Summary: A rift is widening between US marketers and their ad agencies, exacerbated by issues of data, tech and social media.


According to an article in today's issue of US trade magazine AdWeek, marketers increasingly expect their agencies to know more about data, technology and social media, yet few clients are willing to pay for this know-how. In a new survey conducted by business development group RSW/US, top marketing executives were asked to identify the most troubling trend among agencies. Jostling for pole position among marketers' anecdotal responses were such issues as ...

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... lack of innovation, turnover, arrogance, complacency, organisational silos and more.

Moreover, the client-agency divide is not confined to US shores and is replicated in the UK and elsewhere in an ever-shrinking world.

In short, many brand marketers believe agencies talk a big game but fail to deliver deep insights, while another preceived problem is the overlapping area of tech, data and social media.

The complaint that creative-focused agencies downplay data isn't exactly new, while agency leaders accuse marketers of being their own worst enemies by refusing to pay for the level of depth they demand.

Meanwhile, according to agency leaders, marketers are increasingly slashing the fees they pay agencies, thereby making it more difficult for agencies to invest in senior talent that could make them smarter.

Agency bosses also accuse marketers of being less patient and becoming more furtive, making some agencies less inclined to spend ahead of revenue. Agencies argue that they add value to brands and should be seen as an investment, not just another line item expense.

Argues Carter Murray, global ceo of multinational agency FCB: "If clients are making unreasonable demands, we need to stand our ground and get paid fairly for what our teams do."

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2015 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6488

Electronic Business Cards: Set to Soar?

Trend Summary: Electronic Business cards, Adland's latest gizmo, are catching on fast in the USA and are likely to cross the Atlantic any day now.


Advertising Age reports the debut of a high-tech upgrade to the traditional (and often fusty) business card. The brainchild of Isaac Mizrahi, senior vice president and managing director at Miami ad agency Alam, the über card is self-customisable, enabling Mr Mizrahi to display his contact details embellished with Alam's logo, brand colouring and style. Swap a business card with Mr Mizrahi, and you are able to choose ...

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... a link from him via email, mobile phone, text or QR code according to your choice.

The link takes you to a swanky card with Alma's name and "Have Soul" motto at the top (Alma is Spanish for soul). The background is a bright purple, Alma's signature color.

Six buttons offer various options to contact Mr Mizrahi at the office or on his cellphone or by email. The card also links to his Twitter and LinkedIn accounts, plus an office location map. The card can also be shared.

Mr. Mizrahi said everyone at his Miami agency has a profile and photo, with some sixty-five staffers using the new cards.

He reckons he distributes the card electronically five or six times a week, even to unsuspecting folk he meets on a plane en route home from a business meeting.

In January 2014 the Miami shop was named Ad Age's Multicultural Agency of the Year.

Read the original unabridged AdAge.com article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2014 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdAge.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6404

AI Presages "Bye-Bye" to Adland's Copywriters

Trend Summary: Artificial intelligence is in the throes of transformation from an academic curiosity to a scenario that will have a measurable impact on our lives.


According to Christopher Mims, author of the Wall Street Journal's weekly technology column Keywords, the age of intelligent machines has arrived - although they're not remotely akin to Hollywood's hi-tech imaginings. Forget what you've seen in movies; this is no HAL from Stanley Kubrick's sci-fi masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey.  It's more akin to the process that happens when insects, or even fungi ...

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... do when they think."

Or, as Mr Mims retorically asks: "Didn't you know that slime molds can solve mazes?"

Over the past several years, Artificial intelligence [AI hereon] has transformed from an academic curiosity to a force with measurable impact on our lives.

Google Inc used AI to increase by 25% the accuracy of voice recognition in its Android mobile operating system.

Nor is its use confined to IT companies. Associated Press is printing business stories written by AI, while Facebook is toying with it to improve the relevance of the posts it shows to its 1.11bn-plus members.

Writes Mims: "What is especially interesting about this point in the history of AI is that it's no longer just for technology companies. Startups are beginning to adapt it to problems where, at least to me, its applicability is genuinely surprising."

Mr Mims cites advertising copywriting as an example.

He asks: "Could the 'Mad Men' of Don Draper's day have predicted that by the beginning of the next century, they would be replaced by machines?

Yet a company called Persado aims to do just that.

The firm does does only one thing and given its stellar client list - which includes Citigroup  and Motorola Mobility - it apparently does it supremely well, automatically 'writing' cost-effective automated email ads and online 'landing pages'.

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2014 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6399

Trad Ad Shops Glum Over Survival Prospects Come 2019

Bottom Line Trend: In a trend unlikely to be confined to the western shores of the Atlantic, some US ad agencies hold a dismal view of the future, doubting their survival come 2019.


An anonymised survey of 320 senior US advertising and marketing agency leaders reveals a bleak view of the future, predicting that agencies will either become a niche business or extinct over the next five years. Responding to the survey conducted by Cincinnati-based business development specialist RSW/US, one (understandably) anonymous agency executive predicts that future shops will be in disarray, their survival wholly dependent on ...

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... digital capabilities.

Foresees one agency leader: “For the few left standing, it’s an online world.” Said another: “Survivors— and there will be few that make the transition—will all be digital shops.”

However, the outlook is not all gloom and doom. More bullish respondents expect future agencies to be analytical, digitally focused and data-driven, with some behaving more like general contractors than mere ad-makers.

According to one marketing client, successful shops will become “very flexible with third party contractors supplementing the skills the agency may not have.”

While another marketing honcho predicts that shops will “bring in lots of specialists— preferably the best specialist—to execute against individual tactics.”

Read the original unabridged AdWeek article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2014-2019]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6242

Major Marketers Trend Toward In-House Ad Agency Services

Bottom Line: As ad budgets tighten, an increasing number of major US marketers are rejecting ad agency services in favour of in-house resources.


A recent survey conducted by the US Association of National Advertisers reveals that the current tightening of advertising budgets has resulted in an increasing number of ANA members spurning ad agencies, turning instead to in-house resources for their marketing needs. Among the many defectors are such multinational titans as ...

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... Fidelity Investments, Brown Forman, Dell, Wells Fargo, IBM, Hewlett Packard, Marriott Hotels, Jim Beam - and even marketers such as Kraft Foods which hitherto worked with a wide number of ad agency partners.

The survey results indicate that the use of in-house agency services soared by 58% in 2013 so far - up from 42% in 2008.

Five years ago, half of the marketers surveyed said their company didn't have in-house marketing services. This year that number has fallen to 32%.

Conversely, a relatively small percentage of respondents (6%) have discontinued, or are about to discontinue, in-house services. While 4% don't have such services but are planning to add such capabilities.

Moreover, the in-house and outside agencies agency aren't just working in tandem and dividing duties as they have in the past. Instead, the rise of the in-house 'agency' to some extent is happening at the expense of established external services. 

Says ANA ceo Bob Liodice: "I candidly was quite surprised; I did not think this shift had happened. It took such an incredible leap. Sixteen is lot of percentage points [in relation to the penetration of in-house agencies]."

Read the original unabridged Ad Age.com article.

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2013 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdAge.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6175

Native Ads May BeTrad Agencies' Future Nemesis

Bottom Line: Many of the globe's major brands are adopting the trend towards 'native advertising' [aka advertorial].


AdWeek.com, today reports that big brands are becoming increasingly enamoured with 'native advertising', eg ads that simulate and echo actual editorial content. Unsurprisingly, the majority of media owners are are only too happy to oblige. Their problem, however, is how to do so without selling out? In many cases, though, publishers' moral qualms will cede to their need to ...

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... build flagging revenues.

Publications such as Onion, the Huffington Post and Condé Nast's Wired have already ceded to the inevitable and allowed brands to produce sponsored content tailored to their audiences and environment.

Says Wired vp and publisher Howard Mittman: “Clients want to be able to tell a story that resonates deeply inside our community.”

“We tried to find writers we thought had institutional knowledge of what Wired was about, but could help tell brand stories.”

Adds Mr Mittman: "In screening potential contributors, Wired sought people with a strong social media footprint so that if the client so required, the contributor could share the content across their social network for added exposure".

The  trend to native advertising is gradually chipping away at the traditional creative agency's role, as publishers assume a more significant role in the creative process.

Despite all the capabilities offered by Conde Nast's native advertising unit Amplifi, Mittman insists that he’s not trying to usurp the creative agency. 

Here's Wikipedia's definition of native advertising ...

"In printed publications, the advertisement is usually written in the form of an objective article and designed to look like a legitimate and independent news story. In television, the advertisement is similar to a short infomercial presentation of products or services. These can either be in the form of a television commercial or as a segment on a talk show or variety show. In radio, these can take the form of a radio commercial or a discussion between the announcer and representative.

Read the original unabridged AdWeek article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2013 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Adweek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6153

Digital Media 'No Threat' to Ad Agencies

Bottom Line: Analyst refutes Manhattan media myth that ad agencies are threatened by the increasingly fragmented digital media landscape.


Michael Corty, an analyst at Chicago-headquartered investment research firm Morningstar Inc, hailed by The Wall Street Journal as "the top-rated analyst in the advertising and publishing sectors”, has refuted the widely held belief within Manhattan ad agencies that they are under threat from the burgeoning (and increasingly fragmented) digital media landscape. Indeed, Mr Corty believes the converse: that the fundamentals of the advertising agency business are ...

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... actually improved by the current trends in media.

Mr. Corty's take on the situation helped make him the WSJ's top-rated analyst in the advertising and publishing sectors this year. He was also one of the top three media stock pickers. 

Says he: ""Going back five years, there was a feeling that these agencies might get disintermediated by Google or clients placing ads directly online".

"But actually, it turns out that these agencies are more important than ever to their clients, as agencies are crucial in sorting through the increasing complexities of reaching consumers in a digital age."

Corty, who specialises in following media and advertising companies, applies lessons learned from previous roles at Morningstar, including overseeing coverage of media and internet stocks.

He joined Morningstar in 2004 and became team leader for media and internet coverage in 2007. He believes this gives him an advantage in a world where media and technology are converging.

Read the original unabridged WSJ article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q2 2013 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6096

Marketing Giants Predict Ongoing Budgets Squeeze

Bottom Line: Major US advertisers expect to see a continuing squeeze on marketing budgets in coming years - a trend likely to be replicated in Europe and beyond.


Despite improvements in the American economy, a "vast majority" of multinational US advertisers (82%) continue to push for cost savings and marketing budget reductions, reports the Association of National Advertisers [ANA] in its seventh annual Recession Survey.  According to ANA president.ceo Bob Liodice: “The ‘new normal’ for marketers is an environment that ...

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... challenges brands to grow earnings through improved marketing effectiveness and increased spending efficiencies to cut costs.”

Continued Mr Liodice: “Companies expect technology, expanding media platforms and better decision making to better enable marketers to pursue earnings growth objectives.” 

The survey found that marketers are continuing to challenge their agencies to lower costs. However, only 15% plan to cut agency compensation - a significant decrease from 2009 when 56% of marketers squeezed their agencies in this way.

Perhaps more significantly, the research also reveals that from 2013 onward marketers will focus on other means to lower costs and expenditures, including reductions on:

  • Travel (58%)
     
  • Internal agency expenses (55%)
     
  • Advertising campaign media budgets (46%)
     
  • New projects (44%)

The survey marks the seventh occasion on which the ANA has polled its members on the marketing industry's post-recession fiscal focus. The study was executed online in January 2013. Respondents included 120 client-side marketers.

Read the original unabridged ANA article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q2 2013 onward]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: ANA.net
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6064

CMOs to Share Opinions on Ad Agency Performance

Bottom Line: A 'club' of Chief Marketing Officers in major US companies has launched a "vendor rating program" enabling members to share 'likes' (or 'dislikes') of agencies and other marketing services suppliers.


Membership of The CMO Club - currently around seven hundred strong - is limited to US and overseas executives holding a current Chief and/or Head of Marketing position. This week the Club launched a private Vendor Rating Program that enables its membership to exchange frank opinions about the merits or otherwise of suppliers across eighteen product and service categories, ranging from ...

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... creative and media agencies to mobile and analytics firms.

It's a move that could empty the wallets of agency evaluation consultancies. 

In some respects the new service is analagous with consumer-oriented Yelp Inc, a local directory service with social networking and user reviews. 

According to CMO Club founder and president Peter Krainik, he often witnessed chief marketers swapping recommendations informally at the club's dinners and events. "This is us helping people behind closed doors," said Krainik of the new program.

"We're connecting people, that's what the club is all about."

Since the inception of the program at the start of 2013, between five and ten CMOs per month have added recommendations. Mr. Krainik says the listings are growing, with multiple reviews for some vendors, as well as reviews for some bigger agencies.

The group last week began the program promoting the scheme with a PR push.

Evan Greene, CMO for the Grammys, says he's a "big fan" of the vendor-rating program and has both submitted reviews and used the service for recommendations.

"It's really helpful to see what people in a similar role are doing. It's an open exchange of ideas and recommendations".

But the project begs a thorny question.

Will busy marketers - who are concerned with everything from product development to distribution channels to consumer awareness, and not just their agency relationships - have time to regularly log on to submit their recommendations?

Moreover, will they actually be willing to spill the beans? Especially as most marketers view the work done by their agencies as a competitive advantage.

Reassures Krainik: "The review process is not laborious" although it certainly is thorough.

Each entry has fifteen questions, with a mix of drop-down menus and open-ended questions, in addition to basic information like reviewer name and vendor name.

CMOs can rank vendors on quality of service, on-time delivery, price and customer service. Mr. Krainik says that reviews can't be anonymous, and notes that he has personally approved each member of the club.

Read the original unabridged AdAge article.

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2013 onward ]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdAgecom
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6053



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