126 Marketing Trends found for Media / Print


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Adland Slammed by Mothers Union for Commercialisation of Childhood

Trend Summary: In what might prove a serious blow to the UK's ad industry, Mothers' Union has publicly condemned the commercialisation of childhood.


Earlier this week the UK branch of Mothers’ Union asked members of the General Synod of The Church of England to heed concerns voiced by parents about the impact of advertising and commercialism on children and the consequent ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2015 onward]

... well-being of the family.

In a debate chaired by the Rt Revd David Thomson, Bishop of Huntingdon, Mothers’ Union [MU] raised awareness of their Bye Buy Childhood campaign and called upon the Lords Spiritual to raise in Parliament the recommendations drafted by MU based on its recent research.

According to Rachel Aston, Social Policy Manager at MU: “Despite significant progress since our original research in 2010, we know that only 50% of parents feel equipped to manage the significant influence of advertising and the commercial world on their family."

"We want to ensure that parents are empowered to manage the impact of commercialisation, and that government continues to ensure that regulation is working and that industry follows the spirit, as well as the letter of the law when marketing and selling to children.”

Ian Barber, Director of Communications for the Advertising Association, represented the ad industry at the event. He assured those present: “When it comes to children’s well-being, everybody must be ready to play their part.

"The Mother’s Union has inspired a positive debate in our sector and UK advertising is committed to ensuring that marketing to children continues to be responsible and appropriate. Industry initiatives like Media Smart, created to help teachers and parents talk to children about advertising, are a great example of how we can make a real difference.”

Read the original unabridged AnglicanNews.org article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AnglicanNews.org
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6674

The Rise and Rise of Content Marketing

Trend Summary: So-called 'content marketing' continues to grow steadily across the globe, notably among millennial and Gen-X consumers.


PQ Medianomics [PQM hereon], a US-domiciled specialist in global media econometrics and research into emerging media, reports that content marketing revenues worldwide grew 14.4% in the first quarter of 2015, following a 13.3% rise in 2014 to $26.7bn. This is attributed by PQM to higher business-to-business and business-to-consumer content. Content marketing is defined as any marketing that ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2015 - Q4 2019 ]

...  involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content in order to acquire and retain customers.

The survey, which tracks all branded content - including digital videos, apps, games, mobile content, print, research, social media and special events - predicts that content marketing is likely to more than double by 2019, increasing worldwide by a 15.4% compound annual growth rate to $54.25bn.

Moreover, business-to-consumer marketing will increase its share in the coming years versus business-to-business marketing - growing to a 49.5% share in 2019 - up from a 47.3% share in 2014.

PQM's econometric system utilises algorithmic models, data collection techniques and analytical approaches to track, analyse and forecast spending growth, consumption and trends across all fifteen digital media platforms and 50-plus different channels and categories of the global media, entertainment and communications industries.

Read the original unabridged MediaPost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6669

Daily Mail, WPP Back Content Marketing StartUp

Trend Summary: In an alliance of oddities WPP Group has teamed with two unlikely bedfellows to launch a new content marketing agency.


Sir Martin Sorrell's unlikely bedfellows in the new enterprise, branded TrufflePig,are the Daily Mail newspaper group and Snapchat - a text and photo based messaging application for mobile phones. The trio will create online brand-sponsored video and print content in a bid to monetise a slice of the projected ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q2 2015 onward]

... $544 billion in media ad spending.

The fledgling agency will be based within WPP’s Group's content marketing shop in New York. The agency, known as Group SJR, is a digital consultancy specialising in insights, content creation, curation and audience development.

The WPP shop is seeking to sign-up brands to its offering, using the US edition of DailyMail.com, Elite Daily, and Snapchat to test original content marketing.

Hypes Alex Jutkowitz, the head of Group SJR who will run the Truffle Pig agency: “Great content is not just about creating it, but having platforms for it."

“Engaging millennials and having distribution is key. Snapchat is where the millennial fish are and that’s where we are going.”

TrufflePig's content and services will extend to any online platform that a participating brand wishes to use.

Read the original unabridged Bloomberg.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Bloomberg.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6657

Global Newspaper Readership Soars

Trend Summary: A remarkable about-turn in 2014 saw newspaper publishers worldwide garner more revenues from circulation than from advertising.


According to a new global survey commissioned by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers [WAN], for the first time in many decades, newspaper publishers around the world earned more income from circulation sales (including print and digital subscriptions and news stand sales) than from ...

 

[Estimated timeframe:Q2 2015 onward]

... advertising.

The survey also reveals that global newspaper advertising revenues reached $86.8bn in 2014, compared to $92.4bn in circulation revenues - the latter equating to 51.6% of total revenues at circa $179.2bn.

Advertising income included $9.5bn in digital revenues and $77.3bn in print ad revenues.

Over the last few years, however, newspapers’ print ad revenues have tumbled globally from $93.8bn in 2010 to $77.3bn in 2014 - an 18% drop over four years.

In the USA the fall was even more pronounced, with print ad revenues diving 24% from $22.8bn in 2010 to $17.3bn in 2013, the most recent year for which data has been published by the Newspaper Association of America.

Conversely, the WAN report notes that total print newspaper circulation has grown rapidly from 592 million in 2011 to 686 million in 2014, primarily due to increased readership in the developing world, including Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Read the original unabridged MediaPost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6641

Global Publishers Form Climate Change Alliance
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[Estimated timeframe:Q2 2015 onward]


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: StraitsTimes.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6604

TV Retains News Crown as Online Eclipses Newspapers

Trend Summary: Consuming news on websites or smartphone apps is now as popular with Britons as reading newspapers.


According to a report published today by UK media overseer Ofcom, TV remains the most popular way to consume news, although accessing news via the web and mobile apps is now as popular as reading a newspaper. Forty-one percent of the Ofcom survey sample, say they now access news on websites and apps, a significant increase ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q2 2014 onward]

... on the 32% recorded in 2013.

At the same time, consumers' use of websites or apps has overtaken radio (36%) to catch-up on the news - as the chart below demonstrates.

Younger people (16-24) are driving the surge in consuming news on the internet or apps, with 60% doing so in 2014, up from 44% last year. Some 45% of 16-24s said that websites or apps were their most important sources for news, up by a half over the year (30% in 2013).

TV remains the most popular way to consume news with 75% tuning-in during 2014, compared to 78% in 2013.

There has also been a fall in people saying that a TV channel is their most important source for news (from 62% in 2013 to 54% in 2014).

The amount of news watched on TV also varies with age. The over 55s watch an average of 196 hours of TV news each year. This compares to 27 hours for 16-24 year olds, who watch 88 fewer hours of TV news than the average UK adult (115 hours a year).

Those aged over 55 are nearly twice as likely to name a TV channel as their most important source of news, compared to the 16-to-24s (65% compared to 36%).

More younger adults also don’t watch any news on TV (44% versus 25% across all adults).

Read the original unabridged Ofcom article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Ofcom.org
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6352

Content Marketing Set to Go Mainstream in 2014

Trend Summary: Nearly 75% of UK companies say they plan to increase their spend on content marketing during 2014.


According to The Drum magazine's Jon Davie, so-called 'content marketing' (aka 'Native Advertising' and/or 'Advertorial') is on course for spectacular growth this year. Davie cites as his source eConsultancy/Responsys, a UK-based provider of email and cross-channel marketing services. The trend is also endorsed by the (admiitedly partisan) Content Marketing Institute, which predicts that 63% of British marketers plan to ...

 

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2014 onward]

...  increase - or significantly increase - their content marketing spend during the coming twelve months.

The print-based customer publishing industry has been talking about content marketing for years, but the currrent increase in investment is being driven by digital media.

Facebook pages, YouTube channels, Twitter streams, Pinterest boards ... brand managers quickly find that ‘owned’ channels have an insatiable appetite for content.

And it’s not just these new-fangled social platforms that are thirsting for appropriate content, it's any marketing format that involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content in order to acquire customers

Launching a new website? You’re going to need lots of new content.

Got your eye on a shiny new eCRM [electronic customer relationship management] programme? You’ll need plenty of content to fill all those emails.

Or maybe an SEO [search engine optimisation] audit which reveals that your content needs updating - although Davie stresses that Content Marketing doesn’t necessarily mean creating new content.

Read the original unabridged TheDrum.com article.

 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: TheDrum.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6313

Brands Set to Become Publishers, Predicts Unilever Chief

Trend Summary: Now is the time for brands to emulate publishers vis-a-vis their content strategies, says Unilever chief.


Speaking at the Diversification Adaptathon -an event hosted in London last night by the UK's Institute of Practitioners in Advertising Hamish Priest, manager of Unilever’s Dove brand and responsible for global media innovation, media categories and partnerships, declared that ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2014 onward]

... “this is the beginning of the journey to brands becoming more like publishers”. 

Mr Priest conceded that brands are not yet regarded by consumers as publishers. But this may change in time as brands throw their weight behind the creation of meaningful content experiences for consumers.

Said Priest: “We are continually trying to diversify our content to reflect people's changing ways of consuming content.”

One method of doing so is to partner with bloggers, an alliance that can help brands attain “authenticity” and "credibility" in the mind of consumers.

Priest continued: "We are trying to marry together the worlds of the brands and the bloggers. It takes a collaborative effort to get to content like that.”

He added that the role of distribution is as important as the creative element and must be baked-in from the start. “Two billion people use our products every day. In order to really make a difference the content needs to have scale and reach."

But, wonders MarketingTrendTracker, has the incessant hyping of adland's ongoing flavour of the month - 'Native Media' - at long last reached the ears of Unilever's 25-year old whizz kid?

Read the original unabridged TheDrum.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: The Drum.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6257

'Native Marketing' Deception Alarms FTC

Bottom Line Trend: The Federal Trade Commission has warned advertisers it will vigorously enforce its rules controlling Native Advertising.


So-called 'Native Advertising' - ads that appear in online and offline publications, masquerading as news stories or editorial features - have received a stern warning from US regulatory body, the Federal Trade Commission. Native advertising has recently grown more aggressive, especially online. The practice enables brands to target specific audiences and individuals, also to get ... 

[Estimated timeframe: Q4 2013 onward]

... instant feedback when consumers react to what has been displayed. 

There's nothing new about such practices. Three or four decades ago door-to-door salesmen portrayed themselves as opinion pollsters; these days web pages masquerade as unbiased magazine articles. Even when such information is openly labelled as advertising, consumers are frequently misled. 

Addressing several hundred advertisers, academics and media executives at a conference on Native Advertising earlier this week, FTC chairwoman Edith Ramirez conceded that "the delivery of relevant messages and cultivating user engagement are important goals. That is the point of advertising.”

FTC officials said recent surveys of online publishers revealed that 73% offer native advertising opportunities on their sites, while an additional 17% are considering doing so this year.

Some 41% of brands and one-third of advertising agencies currently use such methods, the FTC reports.

According to Chris Laird, marketing director for brand operations at Procter & Gamble, sponsored content enables the company to “immediately measure the impact it is having on our business.”

Vigorous discussion during the conference made it clear that advertisers and marketers are loath to label an “advertisement” as such.

Says Robert Weissman, president of consumer advocacy group Public Citizen: "The word ‘advertisement’ tells people what is being done to them. The whole point of the word ‘sponsored’ is to avoid calling it what it is."

However, David J Franklyn, University of San Francisco law school professor, said preliminary results from his research showed that as many as 35% of the consumers in groups he has studied could not identify an advertisement even when it said “advertisement” on it.

While roughly half of the survey sample indicated they did not know what the word “sponsored” meant.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: NYT.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6222

US Government Heeds 'Native Advertising' Concerns

Bottom Line Trend: So-called 'native advertising' looks to be the marketing industry's 'Next Big Thing'.


The fact that the US government is about to take an active interest in 'Native Advertising' suggests that this melange of ads with editorial content is likely to face a controversial future. This week the first rumblings of government interest [and possible intervention] emerged when the Federal Trade Commission announced it will host a workshop on native ads in Washington DC on December 4. The event will invite representatives from the publishing and advertising industries, as well as ... 

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2013 onward]

... consumer advocates and industry organisations.

Entitled "Blurred Lines: Advertising or Content?”, the workshop will examine:

  • The ways that native ads are presented to consumers 
  • Consumers understanding of native ads
  • Distinguishing native ads from editorial content. 

Some industry organizations have already acted to create self-regulatory frameworks governing native ads.

In October, the American Society of Magazine Editors released an updated version of its editorial guidelines with new suggestions for best practices related to native advertising.

Among many recommendations, the guidelines advise that native ads “should not use type fonts and graphics resembling those used for editorial content and should be visually separated from editorial content.”

Read the original unabridged MediaPost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6208



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