126 Marketing Trends found for Media / Print


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Media Mammoth Amasses €3bn Acquisitions War Chest

Bottom Line: Europe’s largest media company Bertelsmann plans to spend €3.9bn (£3.31bn) on acquisitions over the next three years in a bid to to grow and reduce its reliance on the European market.


Bertelsmann's strategy will be part-funded bythe planned sale of its 17.3% stake in pan-European broadcaster RTL Group, plus current net cash flow of around €500m annually. According to ceo Thomas Rabe, ceo of the Guetersloh, Germany based company, it will focus on individual deals worth “a couple hundred millions of euros” as opposed to a ... 

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2013 - Q4 2015]

... single big acquisition that "wouldn’t fit Bertelsmann’s risk profile”.

The company, which last year benefited from the best-selling book Fifty Shades of Grey, currently relies on Europe for 80% of its sales. Rabe, who took office at the beginning of 2012, is overhauling Bertelsmann’s portfolio with a push into music rights, education and emerging markets. 

Says Mr Rabe: “It is our clear objective to grow the company in the next couple of years. Assuming a little bit of tailwind from a recovery in Europe, we expect to grow to €17bn this year and €18bn in the next.”

Bertelsmann’s total global sales grew 4.5% to €16bn last year, Rabe added, although his forecast doesn’t include potential acquisitions.

Operating earnings before interest and taxes from continuing operations will remain at more than 10% of revenue in coming years even as the company invests in new digital products and reorganizes its legacy businesses such as printing.

Read the original unabridged Bloomberg.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Bloomberg.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6060

Daily Newspapers Set for Radical Decline in Frequency

Bottom Line: Daily newspapers are set for radical decline, with papers reverting from daily publication to thrice or even twice-weekly, predicts Harvard University's Nieman Foundation.


In a series of predictions for Harvard University's Nieman Journalism Lab, former US newspaper publisher Martin Langefeld foresees the rapid decline of the publish-every-day business model favoured by America's daily papers, with editions coming out two or three times a week. And according to an infuential UK real-time news and media information resource, the British newspaper industry is likely to ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2013 onward]

... follow suit in the near future. 

TheMediaBriefing.com reiterates Langefeld's dismal prediction, suggesting that UK publishers with daily and Sunday titles may also follow suit with further integration.

Asks TheMediaBriefing.com rhetorically: "Given the already low volumes of newspaper sales from Monday to Friday, how long before a national daily newspaper drops some editions or goes weekly?"

A glance at the ABC circulation figures shows almost every national UK paper sells significantly fewer copies during the week than at weekends. For example:

  • The Independent sells just 74,000 copies on average Monday to Friday, and The Guardian sells 171,000 on an average weekday, less than half what it sells on a Saturday.
     
  • Even the weekend edition of the Financial Times sells more than during the week.
     
  • Only the Daily Star sells more copies on an average weekday than at weekends.
     
  • There's also a precedent for cutting back on print schedules in the UK in regional media. In April last year Johnston Press announced it was turning five of its titles from dailies into weeklies as part of a "platform-neutral" publishing model, including 24-hour rolling online coverage and replica iPad edition.

Comments TheMediaBriefing: "The flip side of cost savings from fewer editions is having less ad space to sell. But with audiences and ad spend moving away from print, it's no use hanging on to a mass audience based print business model when the audience is shrinking.

"Reducing the frequency of publication could actually increase the value of the remaining print inventory. It's that audience ad buyers want, and if there are fewer opportunities to reach that audience, your remaining ad space becomes much more valuable."

Read the original unabridged NiemenLab article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: NiemanLab.org
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6002

Global Adspend to Buck Recession Thru' 2016

Bottom Line: In its latest global adspend forecast, emarketer.com predicts annual expenditure will grow steadily over the next several years - thanks mainly to emerging markets.


The advertising industry worldwide is expected to defy recessionary trends and increase spending at healthy rates over the next several years, a key driver being increased investment in emerging markets. eMarketer.com bases its latest forecast on the fact that ad spending worldwide rose 5.4% in 2012 to just under $519 billion— bettering 2011’s increase of 3.6% despite recessionary influences. Ad spending will continue ... 

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2013 - Q4 2016 ]

... climb at a similar pace throughout eMarketer’s forecast period, which extends through 2016. By that year, eMarketer forecasts, worldwide ad spending will top $628 billion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fastest growth during the forecast period will come from Latin America, where ad spending is up 11% this year to $34.66 billion. By 2016, ad spending in Latin America will reach $51.33 billion.

Asia-Pacific, Eastern Europe and the Middle East and Africa will also enjoy higher-than-average growth rates, while growth in North America and Western Europe will be significantly slower.

This year, Western Europe has struggled to grow ad spending at all, with several major countries posting spending declines.

Japan is the world's second largest nation in terms of ad spending,al though China is hard on its heels and set to surpass it in 2014.

Moreover, China, the third-largest ad market in the world, is growing much more quickly in terms of adspend than mature markets like the US or Japan.

eMarketer estimates ad spending in China is up 13% this year, slightly higher than Warc’s November 2012 projection of 11.5% growth.

Research firms that predicted significantly higher growth rates tended to make those forecasts earlier in 2012, when overall economic prognostications for China were more favorable. Nonetheless, eMarketer predicts double-digit ad spend growth rates in this massive country through the rest of the forecast period, which will help boost Asia-Pacific (and worldwide) increases.

Read the original unabridged eMarketer article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: eMarketer.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5999

Agency Seers Predict Modest World Ad Growth Thru 2015

Bottom Line: Adland's equivalent of MacBeth's three witches have revealed their latest guesses as to global adspend through to 2015. Prognosis: Ho hum!


Media pundits from the globe's three largest agency holding companies - WPP, Interpublic and Publicis - flaunted their crystal balls at yesterday's UBS Global Media & Communications Conference in New York. The seers' respective prognostications were understandably cautious, although the trio share a similar vision of adspend growth during ... 

[Estimated timeframe: Q4 2012 - Q4 2015 ]

... the coming three years.

Predictions were proffered by WPP's GroupM, IPG's Magna Global  and Publicis Groupe's ZenithOptimedia

  • According to the latter, global ad expenditure will gather a modest head of steam through to 2015. Spending will climb from 4.1% growth in 2013 to $518bn, while by 2015 this will have risen by 5.6% to $574bn.
     
  • GroupM also foresees moderate growth next year, plumping for 4.5%. The WPP media shop cited continuing economic woes in Europe and a lack of blockbuster events that drive advertising, such as the Olympics and US elections.
     
  • Magna Global lowered its forecast for the global advertising economy,  due in part to the slower than expected recovery by Western European economies. Globally, Magna believes the advertising economy will grow 3.1% in 2013 - 1.4% less than its previous projection in June of 2012, which was 4.5%.

Magna reports that the USA remains the world's largest market, projecting $153bn in advertising revenues for 2012 (4% higher than 2011) primarily due to higher political and Olympic advertising spending.

Without such economic stimulus next year, the Interpublic shop predicts that US ad revenues will grow by a meagre 0.6%.

Read the original unabridged MediaPost article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5984

'Wired' Cited as Template for Survival of Magazine Publishing

Bottom Line: 'Wired' magazine maps the future for traditional offline publishing worldwide, UK journalist predicts.


Writing in upmarket UK national newspaper The Independent, media editor Ian Burrell cites the strategy of Wired magazine - the Conde Nast-owned house journal of global geekdom - as a template for the traditional publishing industry's survival worldwide. According to Burrell: "If anyone should know how to address the structural and technological problems facing the media it's Wired magazine, given its ... 

[Estimated timeframe: Q4 2012 onward]

... self-styled status as a soothsayer."

Burrell believes that the title's UK edition is at a pivotal point in its relatively short history, transitioning from a monthly paper product into a business that supplements its revenues with exclusive events, bespoke consultancy services and a retail project, all trading on its reputation for being able to predict the future.

Argues Burrell: "It's a journey that, to varying degrees, the entire print media needs to make but if anyone should know the way to the higher ground it really should be Wired". 

Earlier this month the journal staged Wired 2012, described by its editor David Rowan as "a pretty high ticket price" event [£1600 per head to be exact], for which around forty visionary speakers were parachuted into London from as far afield as the USA, India and South Korea.

Said Rowan prior to the event's opening: "Wired doesn't go in for cosy discussions. There are no panels, they don't work – I go to thirty conferences a year."

For their money, attendees received not just the wisdom of tech pioneers such as Tumblr founder David Karp but also forward-thinking creative artists such as the designer Thomas Heatherwick and the actress and social media entrepreneur Lily Cole.

Editor Rowan works closely with speakers to ensure their talks are well-conceived and not verbose. "Our brand is about tight editing and excellence of design and we have to convey that on stage as well."

Carving down to the real beef, delegates were able to fraternise with hackers, computer security experts and brain scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

As Rowan puts it: "We want to ensure the networking is fantastic so that everyone you meet is worth a long conversation."

Additionally, Rowan is eagerly pursuing retail revenues that also raise his brand's profile via a pop-up Wired store where visitors can sample products chosen by the magazine's editorial team.

But "it's more of an experience than a retail palace," he modestly avers.

It mirrors other Condé Nast ventures such as the Vogue cafes in Moscow and Dubai and a Russian GQ bar. Sited in London's Regent Street (rather than in trendy Old Street among the 'Silicon Roundabout' cyber-startups), befitting a print title that carries upmarket advertisers such as Burberry and Audi.

How long before the fast diminishing number of paper publishers seize similar lifeline?

Read the original unabridged Independent article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Independent.co.uk
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5974

Print Media Melds With Online to Boost Ad Impact

Bottom Line: New 'Touchcode' technology from Germany enables print media to include invisible codes on ads and editorial content. Readable by smartphones or any other device with a touch screen, Touchcode heralds the long-awaited melding of print and online media.


"I have seen the future and it works", wrote US journalist Lincoln Steffens about the newly formed Soviet Union back in  1919.  Touchcode's new invisible codes are infinitely more likely to fulfil Steffens' prophesy. The codes link touchscreen devices to almost any online feature. For example ...  

[Estimated timeframe: Q4 2012 - 2020]

... a concert flyer printed with Touchcode could display a video clip of the performer singing.

The process is economical and simple to use; it can be printed either on paper or foil to digitally enhance the value and increase the function of almost all printed matter.

The technology was developed in Germany by PrintTechnologics, whose flat battery cell was the first printable energy source, boasting the advantages of being both extremely flat and flexible. This opened-up the possibility of completely new application areas. 

The technology has a number of advantages over QR codes, chiefly its simplicity. A user need only place the printed item on the screen of a tablet or smartphone —or place the screen on the item—and the invisible code immediately connects to the online content. There's no need to summon your device's camera and snap a shot of a barcode.

"It does look very novel," William Webb, chief technology officer of UK start-up Neul and an Innovation Awards judge told The Wall Street Journal. "Much simpler than using a camera!"

Read the original unabridged article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5949

Elisabeth Murdoch: Is This Her Play to Helm NewsCorp?

Bottom Line: Delivering the prestigeous MacTaggart lecture at the annual Edinburgh International Television Festival, onloookers had reason to see Elisabeth Murdoch's no-holds-barred address as a power play for the leadership of the family controlled global media empire.


Elisabeth Murdoch, who untill recently ploughed her own highly successful independent business furrow, yesterday electrified her audience at the Edinburgh Television Festival with an address that seemingly criticised the values of the global media empire run by her father Rupert and brother James.  Some, including this scribe, see Ms Murdoch's candid address as a bid for future leadership of News Corporation when mogul Murdoch (or fate) eventually...

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2012 onward ]

... hands over the reins of power. 

According to UK trade website Media Week, Ms Murdoch told her audience that News Corporation was currently asking itself some "very significant and difficult questions about how some behaviours fell so far short of its values".

She continued: "Personally, I believe one of the biggest lessons of the past year has been the need for any organisation to discuss, affirm and institutionalise a rigorous set of values based on an explicit statement of purpose."

The hacking scandal at News Corp's now defunct Sunday newspaper News of the World cost the company $224m (£141.2) in the twelve months to 30 June 2012. It has also led to a number of former employees, including ceo Rebekah Brooks, facing criminal charges.

Prior to her MacTaggart lecture, Ms Murdoch is reported to have said that her brother James had "fucked the company" in his capacity as chairman of NewsCorp's UK newspaper publishing arm when it first became clear that the practice of hacking extended beyond "one rogue reporter".

View the The Guardian's video of Ms Murdoch's MacTaggart Lecture.

View the full unabridged version of this article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: BrandRepublic.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5907

Global Adspend Guesstimated to Reach $533.2bn in 2013

Bottom Line: In a revised forecast issued yesterday [20-Aug-12] GroupM, the media arm of WPP Group, predicts that global ad revenues in 2013 will increase 5.3% versus 2012, rising to $533.2 billion.


The augury, part of GroupM's media and marketing forecasting series, is based on data supplied by parent company WPP Group's global resources. But the uncertain economy, both in Europe and the USA, has led GroupM to revise down its earlier forecast of a 5.1% increase in measured global media adspend for 2012 to $506.3bn. That's a variance of 9.7 percentage points from the media savant's forecast late last year of 6.3% growth to $522bn. The seventy nation forecast also predicts that ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2012 - Q4 2013]

... global adspend in 2013 will increase 5.3% compared to 2012, representing $533.2bn.

The revised spending forecast was made in GroupM’s biannual worldwide report, This Year, Next Year, which also said that 2011 advertising spending in measured media hit $482 billion, a 5% increase versus the 2010 figure of $459bn. 

For the US market, the report predicts that advertising investment in measured media will grow 3.6% in 2012 to a total of $152.5bn, down from the 4% growth projected in the previous report issued in December 2011.

For 2013, the new report predicts a 3.1% increase, representing a total spend of $157.2 bn.

Says GroupM Chief Investment Officer Rino Scanzoni: "We attribute the decline in US ad spending to a number of factors, including a loss of economic momentum, the global deterioration from all continents but particularly the Eurozone and political and fiscal uncertainty at home for the election and beyond.”

To read the full unabridged article click here.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WPP.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5904

World Adspend Set to Soar 22% in 2013

Bottom Line: WPP-owned media-management firm GroupM predicts a relatively meagre uplift in global adspend in 2012, soaring to 22% growth in 2013.


Economic uncertainty, both in Europe and the USA, has prompted WPP Group's media subsidiary GroupM to downgrade its autumn 2012 forecast of 6.3% growth in global adspend for this year. The prediction was yesterday revised downward to 5.1% in measured media growth. Or, in dollar terms, a plunge from $522bn to $506.3bn. But there is a silver lining to this tale of economic woe: according to the 70-nation forecast come 2013 ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2012 - Q4 2013]

...  year-on-year adspending worldwide will increase 5.3%, representing an expenditure uplift of $533.2 billion versus 2012. 

The revised spending forecast was made in GroupM’s biannual worldwide report, This Year, Next Year, which also said that 2011 advertising spending in measured media hit $482 billion, a 5% increase over 2010 spending of $459 billion.

For the US market, the report predicts advertising investment in measured media will grow 3.6% this year to $152.5 billion, down from 4% growth projected in the previous report, issued December 2011.

For 2013, the latest report predicts a 3.1% increase in US media spending, totalling $157.2 billion.

Comments GroupM Chief Investment Officer Rino Scanzoni: “We attribute the decline in US ad spending to a number of factors, including a loss of economic momentum, the global deterioration from all continents but particularly the Eurozone and political and fiscal uncertainty at home for the election and beyond.”

Ad investment in the Eurozone periphery (Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain) fell 6.0% in 2011 and is expected to fall a further 8.8% in 2012 before stabilizing at par in 2013.

But GroupM Futures Director Adam Smith stressed that this prediction “assumes an orderly normalization of the Eurozone.”

Smith said all digital spending trends are positive everywhere irrespective of local economic conditions. “Internet advertising is growing in every country, so powerful is its structural and evolutionary development.”

Read the original unabridged article here.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: GroupM.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5880

US Ad Market Ignores Static Economy, Set to Grow Thru 2012

Bottom Line: Despite static US consumer confidence, becalmed in the doldrums at index point 76 since March, the US ad market is still in growth mode. According to strategic media agency MagnaGlobal, US media spend will grow by 2.2% in 2012.


The American economy, although still far from pre-recession levels (index point 97 in January 2007), will continue to grow through 2012, forecasts Interpublic's worldwide media arm MagnaGlobal. The shop estimates that advertising revenues - excluding political and Olympics related ads - grew 1.6% in the fourth quarter of 2011. But for 2012 Magna forecasts ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q2 2012 onward]

... a slow-down in overall advertising revenue growth in 2012, compared to 2011.

Excluding P&O [profits and overheads?], core media owners advertising revenues (TV, internet, radio, newspapers, magazines and out-of-home) will grow 2.2%. This represents a small increase compared to the shop's previous forecast published in January (2.0%) and remains less than half the 2011 growth (4.8%).

The increase is entirely due to an upward revision in Magna's digital media forecast, following a strong Q4 in 2011 and a robust first quarter in 2012.  

Internet media (including national and local) will grow 12.2% (revised from +10.9%) to reach $35.6 billion and a 20.2% market share. Internet media is still driven by paid search, growing double-digit, as well as mobile advertising (53.1% to $2.4 billion), and online video (24.0% to $2.2 billion). With $1.6bn in 2011, mobile advertising already represents 5% of online advertising and 1% of total advertising in the US.

Says Vincent Letang, Magna's evp and Head of Global Forecasting: “Encouraged by the rise of smartphone and tablet usage and the availability of scalable platforms, mainstream advertisers are now fully embracing all mobile formats (display, search, video, in-app).

“We expect mobile-related online ad revenues to grow 53% in 2012, to $2.4bn. iAd and Facebook in particular will create more opportunities for marketers in various mobile environments in 2012”.

To download the full MagnaGlobal report, click here.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MagnaGlobal.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=5829



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