61 Marketing Trends found for Media / Radio


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BBC to cut senior management bill

The BBC’s £79m pay bill for senior management is set to fall by a quarter and more than 100 positions will go by 2013 under plans approved by the broadcaster’s regulatory body.

Executive directors face an “indefinite” suspension of bonuses under the scheme, put forward after the BBC Trust ordered the executive in February to create a “clear and explicit discount” to BBC managers’ remuneration compared with commercial broadcasters. The trust approved the plan on Thursday.

The BBC’s guaranteed income from the licence fee has been contrasted with the difficulties faced by rival commercial broadcasters. Television advertising revenues are forecast to drop by about 12 per cent this year.

Last November the BBC’s executive board members agreed to forgo their bonuses this year, acknowledging the economic pressures facing the media sector. An 18-month pay freeze was introduced for hundreds of the BBC’s most senior employees in January.

Sir Michael Lyons, the BBC Trust’s chairman, said: “It is right that as a major public service organisation, the BBC shows leadership on this issue during difficult economic times.”

Under the BBC’s latest pay proposals, an extended pay freeze for executive board directors and the elimination of 18 per cent of the BBC’s 643 senior management positions over the next three and a half years will help shave £20m from the BBC’s personnel costs. Senior managers’ bonus suspension will also continue for a further two years.

Mark Thompson, director-general of the BBC, said the most senior managers would see the biggest cutbacks.

“The review published today demonstrates that the BBC is already achieving a significant discount against peer group organisations in its remuneration of senior managers,” Mr Thompson said.

“Nonetheless, I and every other senior manager need to recognise that we are in a different economic climate, that the media sector labour markets are depressed and that there are significant pressures on public finances.”

The reduction in managers’ real-terms pay follows criticism of the pay of BBC’s star presenters, particularly after Jonathan Ross and Russell Brand left lewd messages on the answerphone of the Fawlty Towers actor, Andrew Sachs.

The broadcaster also faced questions on expenses claimed by some executives earlier this year.

Labour and the Conservatives have also criticised the BBC’s management. David Cameron, leader of the opposition, accused the broadcaster of being “over-managed [and] too bureaucratic”.

Sir Michael Lyons said: “Mark Thompson and his team have responded [to the BBC Trust] with a comprehensive set of proposals that strike the right balance between ensuring the BBC can attract the best people to do the job, while ensuring maximum value for the licence fee payer.”


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: FT.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4848

UK Conservative Party wants 'Big Bang' for creative industries

Britain's Conservative Party would foster a relaxed regulatory media environment, akin to the Big Bang in the City, to maximise overseas investment in UK creative industries, the shadow culture secretary said on Thursday.

Spokesman Jeremy Hunt said David Cameron, his party leader, was “very sympathetic” to the idea of relaxing advertising constraints on ITV and other commercial broadcasters.

His party wanted to reproduce for the creative industries the effects that deregulation had on London’s financial centre in the 1980s.

Speaking to a meeting of the Broadcasting Press Guild, Mr Hunt added that there was one area where they would be cautious about deregulation for broadcasters: “Where we would hesitate is the number of minutes of advertising every hour,” he said, arguing that a situation such as in the US, where network television had 18 minutes of advertising an hour, merely enshrined the habit of ad-skipping among viewers.

“But we are willing to look at pretty much everything else,” he said.

Asked specifically about the current requirement on broadcasters to sell every minute of available airtime, which ITV says has a deflationary effect, Mr Hunt said: “We haven’t made a final decision but we are very sympathetic to the idea that as many as possible of those regulations need to be removed.”

He referred to a panel of advisers set up by himself and Mr Cameron last March, led by Greg Dyke, the former director-general of the BBC.

Mr Hunt said: “I have asked Greg to look at the question of what are the set of policies that a Conservative government could do which would maximise investment in UK creative industries both by UK companies and by overseas companies.

“The analogy that I drew was with Big Bang in the City in the early 80s. [Before that] we had a pretty respected financial services industry but it wasn’t dominant. Then we had a set of policies in the Big Bang that meant London, with New York, was one of the two dominant markets in the world.

“So what are the equivalent policies for the UK creative industries that could stimulate that investment and help us move to being one of the great global giants? That’s the objective I set Greg,” he said.

Mr Hunt indicated that he would not push for the privatisation of Channel 4 but said that, if elected, a Conservative government might legislate to scrap the BBC Trust, the sovereign body of the BBC, before the corporation’s royal charter came up for renewal in 2016. He said the trust was “not working”.

Mr Hunt also said the BBC should waive its automatic inflation-rate increase in the licence fee next year.


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Source: FT.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4795

BBC licence fee should be cut and ruling trust scrapped, says politico

The BBC licence fee should be cut and the corporation’s dramatic expansion halted, the Culture Secretary said yesterday. Ben Bradshaw also called for its governing body to be scrapped.

The £5 billion corporation “probably has reached the limits of reasonable expansion”, he said, and hinted that the “multimedia empire” needed to be cut down in size.

Speaking at the Royal Television Society’s biennial convention in Cambridge, Mr Bradshaw said that “there may indeed be a case for a smaller licence fee” — although he added that any cuts would have to wait until the fee is next reviewed in 2013.

Entering the debate over the £6 million a year paid to Jonathan Ross, Mr Bradshaw said that the BBC was “right to be looking more carefully at what it pays its stars and executives”. Mark Thompson, the Director-General of the BBC, was paid £834,000 last year.

Mr Bradshaw’s speech, probably the most serious attack on the BBC by a minister since the aftermath of the Iraq invasion, marks an about-turn by the Government, which spent most of the past decade allowing the BBC to expand dramatically with online services and digital channels.

The Culture Secretary also made it clear that he wanted to scrap the BBC Trust set up three years ago by his predecessors, Tessa Jowell and James Purnell. The trust, under the chairmanship of Sir Michael Lyons who is a former Labour councillor, is the internal regulator of the BBC.

Mr Bradshaw said: “Although the trust has performed better than its predecessor, I don’t think it is a sustainable model in the long term. I know of no other area of public life where the same body is both regulator and cheerleader.”

Jeremy Hunt, the Shadow Culture Secretary, responded by accusing ministers of “taking yet more Conservative policies”. He said: “People will ask if there is any consistency whatsoever in media policy when the Culture Secretary has proposed abolishing a body set up by his own Government less than three years ago.”

Mr Bradshaw’s intervention comes less than a month after James Murdoch, the chairman of News Corporation in Europe and Asia, criticised the BBC’s “chilling” expansion plans and said that it should be smaller. The Culture Secretary said that Mr Murdoch was “right to raise questions about the BBC’s size, its remit and its impact on the rest of the British media industry”. News Corporation is the parent company of The Times.

But Mr Bradshaw also said that he disagreed profoundly with Mr Murdoch on other issues, adding that he was wrong to describe Britain’s media landscape as “Orwellian”. Mr Bradshaw said: “Being publicly funded or subject to statutory regulation does not equate with state control. East German TV was state controlled.”

The minister called for a public debate on the future of the BBC, saying that its fate was not a matter for “media moguls or politicians”. It was up to the public to decide whether “we want the BBC to survive and, if so, what do we want it to do and how do we want to pay for it?”

Mr Bradshaw was challenged after his speech by Sir Michael, who told him that the trust had been “set up by your predecessor, Tessa Jowell”, and had been given the job to act as “the ears, eyes and voice of licence fee payers”.

• Channel 4 and the BBC should be merged to protect children’s programming because broadcasters are failing teenagers, the creator of Grange Hill said yesterday.

Phil Redmond, who also created Hollyoaks and Brookside, said that a merger of the publicly owned corporations would free budgets to ensure that children were catered for.

Giving the Huw Wheldon Memorial Lecture at the Royal Television Society conference in Cambridge, Mr Redmond said that problems had arisen because “broadcasters have decided that childhood ends at 12”. He added: “If there’s nothing on, they reach for the remote. Disconnect.”

 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: TimesOnline.co.uk
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4780

BBC considers a partial float of commercial arm

The BBC is considering a partial flotation of BBC Worldwide, its commercial arm, leaving it with a stake in the business as low as 20 per cent, a person familiar with the broadcaster's strategy said yesterday.

Floated on the stock market or with a minority stake sold to a trade buyer such as a US network, BBC Worldwide, which markets BBC programmes, magazines and merchandise around the world, could act as a global shop window for all UK television content.

"The BBC need only keep 20 to 25 per cent and a couple of people on the board and still be exercising [what it regards as] sufficient control," the person familiar with the strategy said.

"I think the debate will be over what type of sale it is and what percentage the BBC will want to retain.

"It could be a retail offer, it could be a listing with a large retail element or it could be a private placement."

Mark Thompson, the BBC director-general, said in a newspaper interview published yesterday that one question to be answered in a strategic review announ-ced last week is whether it would be necessary to retain full ownership of Worldwide. However, a listing is only one possibility and not the most likely, a BBC executive said.

A partial flotation of a business built on licence-fee payers' money could be hard to justify, the executive said. In the past, the Treasury has opposed any idea of partial equity sales involving BBC Worldwide, since it would deflect revenue streams from the BBC to shareholders.

"Nothing is being ruled out but I think we would always prefer something that added value to the company, and that makes a partnership [rather than a flotation] a much more likely outcome," the executive said.

The BBC has drawn criticism from rivals for distorting UK media markets, an argument that has won the sympathy of senior Conservative figures, who look set to take power by the middle of next year.

But the Labour government has also announced that it will cut the BBC's £3.6bn funding - a move the broadcaster has resisted.

"This could be a signal to the Conservatives, showing they are willing to reduce the size of the BBC, but it is also a sign to the current government that if they want to do a deal over the size of the BBC's funding, that is still possible," said the person familiar with the strategy.


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Source: FT.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4764

America's FCC to study ways to block sex, violence from kids

"Parents must have access to control technologies that can appropriately limit their children's exposure to unsuitable material," FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said in releasing an agency report detailing the technologies available to parents.


The FCC report concluded that no single parental control technology works across all the media platforms, such as over-the-air, cable and satellite television; wireless services and the Internet.

In July the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing during which Genachowski said the existing rules governing television programing for children will be reviewed in light of the proliferation of online videos and other technological changes.

Committee chairman John Rockefeller, a West Virginia Democrat, said more must be done by lawmakers, industry and the government to help parents block inappropriate content from children.

"We must offer the tools and policies that make it easy for people to be good parents and oversee the viewing that goes on in their homes." Rockefeller said in a statement.

"We must do more than simply gather information and hope this alone protects our children."

 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: ibtimes.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4700

Researcher Predicts Local Ads to Hit Bottom in 2010

It's not easy to host a "Winning Media Strategies" when the numbers are going down, but that´s exactly what BIA and its sister company The Kelsey Group are doing this week at their conference in Washington, D.C.

[Estimated timeframe:2009-onward]

Local advertising media -- including newspapers, direct mail, TV, radio, Yellow Pages, traditional outdoor, cable TV, magazines and digital/online -- are collectively forecast to decline to $144.4 billion in 2013, down from $155 billion last year.

This year, local ad revenue will drop to $141.3 billion and hit a low of $135.8 billion in 2010, before reversing direction in 2011.

The predictions, presented Thursday by Mark Fratrik, vp of BIA advisory services, and Neal Polacheck, CEO of TKG, were based on the cyclical and secular changes in local media, as well as the state of the economy and trends in the Internet.

For some media -- including newspapers, local TV, radio, print, Yellow Pages and local regional magazines -- the Internet is causing executives to rethink business models in order to survive.

Other media -- including direct mail, outdoor, cable TV and digital/online interactive -- will need to ride out a brutal economy.

For both groups, new media present opportunities for fresh revenue streams. New media´s share of total adspend is forecast to grow from $14 billion or 9 percent to $32.1 billion to 22.2 percent. Radio and TV Internet revenue are expected to climb from $805 million last year to nearly $1.9 billion in 2013.

New media´s growth will occur most dramatically in search -- both local and otherwise. Queries per month per user are forecast to grow to 130 by 2013, with local queries reaching about 15 percent of the total by 2013. There are also significant opportunities in e-mail, lead generation and mobile applications.


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Source: Adweek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4092

US Radio Accountability Initiative Announced at RAB Conference

Ad-ID today announced the "Radio Accountability Initiative," which was endorsed by the Radio Advertising Bureau (RAB) at its RAB `09 conference. Harold S. Geller, senior vice president, cross-industry workflow, 4A's, and managing director, Ad-ID LLC, announced the initiative during a panel discussion entitled "Increasing Cash Flow and Decreasing Makegoods Through Digital Commercial Workflow." The Initiative will address accountability and distribution platforms that ensure the right commercials get on the right stations.

[Estimated timeframe:2009-onward]

In endorsing the Initiative, Jeff Haley, president-CEO, RAB, said "As radio aims to grow its share of ad dollars, proof of performance, improved commercial workflow and consumer interactivity are increasingly important at the station level. It is beneficial to make radio commercials as interactive as the purchase-enabled songs to which they are attached."

"Accountability in radio revolves around identification. If you can consistently identify a spot, the advertiser it's associated with, and centrally access other necessary information, you create an environment where accountability and transparency are core capabilities," added Harold S. Geller, managing director, Ad-ID LLC. "Each of the founding participants in this initiative plays a key role in radio workflow; together they can demonstrate the accountability of radio."

Initial initiative participants include: Allen Hartle, founder/CEO, Jump2Go; Dale Graham, president / CEO, ClearStreaming Inc.; Harold S. Geller, managing director, Ad-ID LLC; Joe Rivera, vp/director of operations, FirstSpin Inc.; Rick Rowland, president, PowerLink Software.

Additional vendors and station groups will join as this initiative launches. There will be no restrictions to participation other than supporting Ad-ID. If advertisers choose to code ads outside of Ad-ID, a station's own policy will govern how that ad is treated.

"The founding participants of the Radio Accountability Initiative can make radio more accountable with limited disruption to existing workflow," added Geller. "Obviously as more vendors come on board, and adopt Ad-ID and XMP, more capabilities will emerge."

About the Founding Partners

Ad-ID is the only advertising asset coding system supported and authorized by the American Association of Advertising Agencies (4A's) and the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) across all media. It is guaranteed to be globally unique and has more than 70 metadata fields, (including: advertiser, product, brand, ad title, medium, agency, and length / size). Ad-ID is a flexible metadata model that can integrate requirements of any media, and provides Web services that enable the easy retrieval of data by authorized users. There are currently over 700 advertisers, including 78 of the top 100 in the United States, signed up for Ad-ID. For this initiative, Ad-ID becomes the foundation of the digital workflow.

Adobe's Extensible Metadata Platform (XMP) is a labeling technology that allows you to embed data about a file, known as metadata, into the file itself. With XMP, desktop applications and back-end automation systems gain a common method for capturing, sharing and leveraging this valuable metadata, thereby opening the door for more efficient job processing, workflow automation and rights management. In this initiative, XMP will be implemented to take the guesswork out of ad identification. Adobe has been approached to endorse this initiative.

FirstSpin's radio distribution platform ensures that commercial spots make it to the radio station, in time for air and with minimal manual intervention. Integration to Ad-ID's central database of information about ads reduces a step of rekeying, and ensures that vendors further down the workflow will have the necessary data. FirstSpin plans to use XMP to embed the Ad-ID in the file, which will further automate station commercial operations.

Jump2Go is designed to make radio commercials as interactive as the purchase-enabled songs to which they're attached, using the RDS layer of analog broadcast. Jump2Go will use Ad-ID to manage the identification of the ad; Jump2Go will also maintain a database of text that is associated with the Ad-ID based on the available output devices.

PowerLink Software's "Proof of Play" demonstrates the accountability of radio with definitive proof that commercials aired correctly. It can monitor ads before, during and after airplay via the Web. Combine Posting results and late copy change requests to the same screen and you have a one-stop shop for Ad buyers to be serviced with the latest technology! Power-Link's integration with Ad-ID, enables it to use standardized data to aggregate across stations and markets in real time.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: ANA.net
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=3919

In UK, Testing an Automated Media-Trading System

Automated media-trading is not a new idea. But getting a system that media sellers and buyers can agree to for the most coveted ad space has proven nearly impossible to create. Enter MediaEquals, a new U.K.-based player with ambitions to secure the whole world's media inventory on its system. MediaEquals is currently running trials with six major media buyers -- Omnicom, WPP, Publicis, Aegis, Interpublic and Havas -- and with media owners, including BBC Magazines, The Guardian Media Group and Bauer Publishing.

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2009-onward]

"MediaEquals' ambition and vision is different," said Jim Marshall, chairman of Publicis Groupe's Starcom U.K. "It's not for niche parts of the media and online; they want to create an electronic online trading system that covers all media -- and it's not about distressed sales."

MediaEquals is by no means the first to go down this road. Google's AdWords, Yahoo's RightMedia, and Microsoft's adECN have all managed to capture previously untapped business at the lower end of the ad market, making it easy for local and smaller advertisers to buy targeted ads online. Even Google has backed away from more ambitious plans to sell print and radio ads (although its fledgling Google TV program is still in place).

MediaEquals, which has been in development for three years, claims to offer something more than rival auction-based or pure transaction systems. The founders claim that it replicates the way media is bought and sold in the real world and acts as a vehicle to free up time that can be invested in creativity and developing contacts.

MediaEquals is headed by entrepreneurial executive chairman Martin Banbury, founder of media and marketing group The Mission, part owner of insurance group Insure & Go, and a former brand manager at Procter & Gamble.

Mr. Banbury has just expanded the board to signal his international ambitions. Non-executive chairman John Farrell, until recently president-CEO of Publicis´ SAMS Worldwide, and non-executive director Hannu Ryopponen, ex chief financial officer of Ikea, sit alongside a media owner, an online entrepreneur and a financier. The idea is to eventually get MediaEquals´ trading system up and running beyond the U.K., including in the U.S.

"The media industry is pretty well-run and the next step change requires a technology breakthrough," Mr. Farrell said. "MediaEdge potentially brings this. It allows agencies to focus not on process and implementation but on value-added strategic thinking. For media owners it allows them to worry less about the management of inventory and spend more time on the creative end of their inventory. It´s anything but a commoditization -- it allows a focus on creativity."

What the industry needs
Whether MediaEquals has the solution, the problems of a complex marketplace and the proliferation of media have resulted in frustrated agencies and sellers spending increasing amounts of time on administration.

"There´s no doubt the industry will have to move to online trading systems, just because of the sheer volume of inventory and its demand on time and resources," Mr. Marshall said. "There´s a lot going on in this area -- the value of an online trading system is all about reducing processing costs. Can MediaEquals do that? It´s debatable, but it´s what they are setting out to do and they have got it more right than most."

Danny Donovan, managing director of Initiative London, said, "Previous attempts to launch online media-trading platforms have had only marginal success, primarily because they have tried to change the trading process rather than build on existing practices. MediaEquals has approached the problem from the other end -- what the industry needs, not what the internet likes it to accept."

"We are replicating the way that people trade now but in electronic form," Mr. Banbury said. "We won´t increase the level of commoditization -- we could reduce it by freeing up more time for people to spend on the phone building and using relationships to make sure they´re doing the best job possible. The holy grail is efficiencies without commoditization."

Mr. Marshall, however, said, "MediaEquals says it reflects the way the market trades, but to come up with a really efficient system you will have to impact the way media owners trade and price."

MediaEquals allows for regular trading, but the negotiations take place online, providing a useful record of all conversations in the process. All inventory is instantly updated, and every individual must log on to the system.

Matt Teeman, director-ad sales, BBC Magazines, said, "For us, this is definitely not about selling distressed inventory; it´s about getting more eyeballs on our core media in a way that may actually save us and our advertisers time."

"We are not taking the art out of buying and selling -- we are improving it," Mr. Banbury said. He gave the example of an advertiser at the last minute pulling out of a prime spot, such as a 30-second commercial booked on the Super Bowl. Instead of getting the sales team to make individual phone calls to their contacts (making sure not to double up and sell the space twice), they can send out an availability notice to every relevant client, with the expectation of securing a decent price.

Another function allows media owners to vet which marketers have access to their space. A "black, white and gray" system blocks out some buyers completely, allows some full access and lets others view but not trade certain space.

MediaEquals works via the web and won´t charge for use of the system. It will instead charge media owners a "tiny proportion" of the value of each trade, which Mr. Banbury claims will be a lot less than the improvement they will see in overall trade.

Mr. Banbury has some even more radical plans for MediaEquals in the long-term. He wants to develop the technology to accommodate a brokerage system, where marketers, media buyers and even city traders can buy options on future space -- perhaps, for example, during premium events such as the 2012 Olympics -- and even sell on those options as futures.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdAge.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4582

For Media Business, The New Normal Is Ugly - Forbes.com
For US Media Business, the new 'normal´ is ugly Those apocryphal "green shoots" in the U.S. economy have yet to take root in the media business, says a new study from private equity fund Catalyst Investors. In fact, this year will be an "annus horribilis" for traditional media, says Catalyst. Get used to it: Mainstream media´s advertising meltdown ......

For US Media Business, the new 'normal´ is ugly

Those apocryphal "green shoots" in the U.S. economy have yet to take root in the media business, says a new study from private equity fund Catalyst Investors.

In fact, this year will be an "annus horribilis" for traditional media, says Catalyst. Get used to it: Mainstream media´s advertising meltdown is the "new normal" for the ad business. Plummeting consumer spending and the Web´s ability to eat away at the pricing power of traditional media has driven the declines. In the magazine sector, for example, the drop in ad dollars is fueled in part by the move to "just-in-time spot ads vs. advance ad purchasing."

The report documents historical drivers in all of this. From 1976 to 2000, a boom in consumer spending touched off an explosive demand for new advertising inventory. That produced an overwhelming supply, "…making the 1980s the heyday of media fortunes." Cable programmers rolled out new shows and channels; magazines expanded their page counts. Later, the ad boom helped build the Web itself. "Now we have a nearly unlimited supply of potential advertising inventory," says the report.

That buildout has come full circle. Spending as a percentage of gross domestic product declined in the years that followed (2000 to 2007)--Catalyst blames the Internet. Its unlimited content and ability to measure ad impact broke "the oligopolistic pricing power that traditional media enjoyed in the 1980s and 1990s." A further dip in ad spending as a percent of GDP will occur over the next two to three years, predicts Catalyst.

No green shoots here, but there are some bright spots. The report predicts that the slide in radio and magazine revenue will bottom in 2009. Diminishing equity value across the broadcasting and publishing industries means they will not return without a good deal more dilution and debt restructuring. The next two years could be "an opportune time" for private equity players to get back in the media game. Catalyst expects a 5% revenue bounce in the radio and magazine sectors in 2011.


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Source:
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4421

Rajar figures show continued growth of digital radio | News | New Media Age
UK figures show continued growth of digital radio Fri, 3 Jul 2009 | By Luan Goldie Internet radio is continuing to boom, according to the latest Rajar [ Radio Joint Audience Research, which measures and profiles the audiences of UK radio stations] findings, with 16.9m UK adults tuning in online. The fourth survey of internet-delivered audio services found a third of UK adults listene......

UK figures show continued growth of digital radio

Fri, 3 Jul 2009 | By Luan Goldie

Internet radio is continuing to boom, according to the latest Rajar [ Radio Joint Audience Research, which measures and profiles the audiences of UK radio stations] findings, with 16.9m UK adults tuning in online.

The fourth survey of internet-delivered audio services found a third of UK adults listened online, and the number of those using personalised online radio services had increased from 2.9m to 3.9m since October 2008.

Listen Again services were also found popular, with listeners consuming an average of 1.6 programmes each week. The majority of such listeners, 70%, said their use of the service had no impact on the amount of live radio they listened to.

Other findings included a wide awareness of Wi-Fi radio, with 7.1m people claiming to be familiar with the term, and 1m claiming to own one.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source:
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=4374



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