315 Marketing Trends found for Research / Consumer research


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Nielsen to Measure Facebook Conversations About TV Programmes

MarketingTrendtracker Summary: Nielsen is to extend its Twitter coverage of social media conversations about TV programmes to include Facebook.


Nielsen plans to make the new data, dubbed 'Social Content Ratings', available to clients in the first half of this year. The new ratings will incorporate all Facebook posts, including those shared with ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2016 Onward]

... friends and family.

According to Nielsen's social president Sean Casey: "The development of Social Content Ratings reflects Nielsen's commitment to continually adapt our services to meet the needs of the industry and is part of Nielsen's ongoing effort to evolve our measurement to reflect the total audience across screens and platforms".

He added: "Nielsen Social measurement is evolving to provide a comprehensive, standardised picture of how consumers are responding to programme content through social media, wherever and whenever."

The Social Content ratings are expected to be available in markets where the company's Twitter TV Ratings service currently operates (the USA, Australia, Italy and Mexico). Nielsen also plans to eventually integrate data from Instagram.

The service will not be available in the UK, where the TV ratings roost is ruled by TNS.

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6814

Emotional Tracking Set to Become Major Marketing Trend

Marketing Trend Summary: The tracking of people's emotions is likely to emerge as one of the marketing trends of 2016.


If recent research, technology developments and partnerships are a guide, the alliance recently formed between media agency MediaCom and Oxford University start-up Realeyes, could trigger a significant marketing trend that uses webcams to measure people's ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2016 onward]

... emotions whilst watching video content.

In what is claimed to be the first partnership deal of its kind for a media agency, the tie-up will enable MediaCom to assess the emotional power of each and every segment of video content it briefs it's media and production partners to make or create in-house, thus ensuring that clients' messages are as engaging as possible and delivered to the most receptive audience segments.

However, researchers at Brigham Young University, a private research university located in Utah USA, have come up with a simpler method of tracking emotions. Last month they revealed that it is possible to assess the emotions of desktop web users by tracking their mouse movements.

Read the original unabridged Warc.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Warc.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6805

The Life and Times of Generation Z

Trend Summary: Marketers should not make glib assumptions about the Generation Z age group given its contradictory attitudes and habits.


A paper published today by Warc [World Advertising Research Center] warns marketers not to make slick assumptions about the Generation Z age group, given its post-Millenial characteristics and everchanging culture. Members of this age group are defined as people with birth years ranging from ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2016 - Q4 2025]

... the mid-or-late 1990s to 2010 and onward to circa 2025.

G-Zers contradictory attitudes and habits while their culture is ever changing.

Such traits make long-term planning problematic according to Warc's Toolkit 2016, which quotes one researcher as saying five years is too far ahead ahead.

The age group's sometimes contrary nature is evident in the research which found 86% of GZ-ers use their smartphone several times a day, while  79% agree that people of their age spend too much time on digital devices.

Moreover 69% watch more than two hours of television daily, while 70% say they watch more than two hours of YouTube content daily.

Despite these apparent contradictions, there are some things that can be confidently stated about "Generation Swipe", including its affinity with digital technology.

Research conducted in Asia also suggests that access to technology by GZ-ers  is shaping not just media consumption but friendships and entire lives: in Vietnam, half of this age group said they felt most comfortable communicating via chat apps or text.

Read the original unabridged Warc.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Warc.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6801

New Technolopgy Enables Marketers to Measure Mobile Ad Response

Trend Summary: New technology enables marketers to run studies to ascertain how people respond to their mobile ads.


To enable brands to quantify the impact of mobile ads after they're displayed to consumers, WPP Group offshoot Medialets is linking its ad-targeting technology to the group's Millward Brown Digital brand-lift studies. After serving a mobile ad, marketers will be able to run a study to ascertain whether or not the ad is remembered by it's ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2016 Onward]

... target audience.

This is manna from heaven for marketers who have struggled for years to prove that mobile advertising is effective, largely because smartphone-size campaigns lack the same measurement and targeting capabilities expected by desktop advertisers.

Says Richy Glassberg, Medialets ceo: "What marketers are concerned about today is the staggering shift from desktop to a mobile device".

Glassberg also notes that "In the last two to three years, mobile has taken 60% of all digital usage, but the spending is so far behind. The tools that they use in desktop aren't translating to mobile."

Instead of using cookies, Medialets' technology anonymously tracks mobile IDs to help advertisers target specific groups of consumers. After identifying that someone saw an ad, brands can run follow-up surveys with questions like "Do you remember the ad you just saw?" or "How likely are you to buy the product you just saw advertised?"

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6800

Google's Latest Mantra: "Consumers Intent Beats Identity"

Trend Summary: Google declares that a searcher's intention is more important to marketers than his or her actual identity.


Google, more than any other internet entity, has a stake in keeping people searching online, which explains the search titan's current focus on learning what its users want as much as ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2015 onward]

... who they are.

According to research Google commissioned from Millward Brown Digital, demographics don't always align with user intent. In fact, marketers could be missing as much as 70% of potential mobile shoppers by not understanding what those shoppers are searching for at any given time.

These moments in time, which Google dubs Micro-Moments, are key to winning over people's minds and, of course their money. The research also reveals that 82% of smartphone users now turn to their phones to help them make purchasing decisions whilst they're in a store.

In a blog post published today, Lisa Gevelber, Google's vp of marketing, describes this syndrome thus: "Intent beats identity, Immediacy trumps loyalty".

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6791

Big Brands Adopt 'Micro Moments' Digital Technology

Trend Summary: New digital technology is spurring brands to seek specific "micro-moments", enabling them to display the right messages to the right consumers.


The above trend is one of several for 2016 identified by the World Advertising Research Center's [Warc] Toolkit 2016. The Warc study  highlights the role technological developments such as Buy Buttons can play, and also examines how some marketing teams have restructured around ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q2 2015 - Q4 2016]

... "moments" rather than brands.

The study cites alcoholic beverages titan Pernod Ricard as an example of the "micro moments" trend, where the company's focus is now on "consumption moments" rather than individual brands. This change in consumer focus was triggered by the realisation that consumers don't stick to one brand but have a repertoire of brands linked to a a variety of drinking occasions.

However, William Grobel, Senior Manager at Deloitte Digital, stresses that "moment marketing" is a complement to, and not a substitute for, campaign-based marketing".

Mr Grobel's maxim is also understood by Johnson & Johnson after its "social listening" revealed that mothers of young babies were taking to social media around 4am asking for tips on getting their child to sleep.

Accordingly the company took advantage of this moment of opportunity by designing relevant messages specifically for consumption on tablets which are the preferred device used by mothers in small hours.

Read the original unabridged Warc.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Warc.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6789

Media Insights Giant Nielsen Unveils Comparable Metrics Data
Trend Summary: In a move that many marketers and media agencies might think overdue, Nlelsen has released its first Comparable Metrics Report.

Multinational information and measurement company Nielsen has published its first Comparable Metrics Report [CMR] which reveals how many adult consumers access a given platform or content type in an average week; how often these consumers access that content and how much time they spend engaging with ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2015 onward]

 ... that content.

The CMR was revealed in Nielsen’s first-quarter 2015 report as part of its Total Audience Report, which examines long-term quarter-by-quarter comparisons of different media platforms.

Nielsen measures its total usage of these platforms among adults by age, race and ethnicity. It also breaks out digital measurement into video, streaming audio, and social networking.

TV connected devices yield a 97 million reach - 40.4% of the population for US adults aged 18 and over; 2.9 days/week and 174 minutes/day of usage; and 202 minutes/adult per week.

Read the original unabridged Media Daily News Report.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6783

Data Now Drives Brand Awareness As Well As Sales

Trend Summary: Recent research reveals that a customer makes, on average, 9.5 visits to a brand website before making a purchase.


In the interim that customer will research, chat to friends and undoubtedly check the competition, according to New York headquartered Rakuten Marketing. This makes for a complex, multichannel, multi-device customer journey meaning that brands must use data to ensure that  ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2015 onward]

... their marketing is effective in a number of contexts, including the traditionally opposing objectives of brand awareness and direct response. 

As consumers’ purchase journeys get longer, the chance that they will find a better match elsewhere increases, but so too does the amount of data at a brand’s disposal. From that first interaction – a click on a website, advert or social media post – marketers need to use this data to ensure that people return to their website.

Says Jenny Parker, co-founder and marketing director at Country Attire: “Retailers frequently say they have ‘no data’ on their customers, particularly for first time visitors at the top of the funnel, but this isn’t true”.

“First-time visitors to a website come with a whole trail of useful data to help the brand produce relevant content.”

Getting the balance right is not easy. Frequency, type of interaction and the level of interaction are all key considerations – as is the content.

As an example of low-pressure marketing to boost engagement and brand objectives (as opposed to new subscriptions or renewals) dating site eHarmony turns data into ‘tips’ to help users be more successful on dates.

“That’s the type of content consumers are looking for,” says the site's UK marketing director Romain Bertrand.

Read the original unabridged MarketingWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MarketingWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6757

Consumer Attitudes Now More Important than Age in Targeting

Trend Summary: New research indicates that demographics are not yet dead as a means of segmenting consumer target markets.


According to an article by Mindi Chahal in the current edition of Marketing Week, consumers’ attitudes are more likely to accurately categorise them than standard classifications such as age or social grade. Recent research suggests that marketers could be missing out by targeting apparently receptive consumers given that the latest data dispels myths surrounding ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2015 onward]

...  traditional marketing segments.

Although some demographic groups continue to show a strong affinity with particular brands, they are often not the ones marketers would naturally expect.

The study of 1,500 UK consumers, conducted by London-based Network Research, examines the way in which people relate to some of the UK’s most popular brands based on rational and emotional attitudes. This, the company claims, reveals an alternative view on traditional age, gender, income and social grade segmentation.

More significantly, it also suggests that consumers might be better targeted by their attitudes and gives examples of sectors that might need to alter the way they think about audiences.

One such example is TSB, which historically had an older, financially conservative audience prior to its merger with Lloyds Bank in 1995, whereas the research shows that early adopters heavily favour the relaunched company, which offers an opportunity to think less conservatively about channel and product propositions.

The study also shows that people with the highest concerns about security of their personal data are aged over 65. A substantial majority (89.7%) of whom say they are worried. This will not come as a surprise, but personal security concerns also score highly (83.4%) among those aged 25 to 34.

Read the original unabridged Marketing Week.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MarketingWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6745

Marketers' Perception of Millennials is Wrong Says 'The Economist'

Trend Summary: According to the highly respected UK based weekly newspaper,'The Economist', millennials (the generation over which marketers salivate) aren't who you think them to be. 


In conjunction with Bloomberg Worldwide, The Economist seeks to create a global picture of the affluent millennial mentality across four continents. Surveying nearly 90,000 millennials, Generation Xers and baby boomers, the two media companies hope to better understand the media consumption habits of a generation some say is hard to define, while others argue is equally ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2015 onward]

...  hard to target.

According to Nick Blunden, global managing director of The Economist: "The genesis of the reason why we did it is there is a lot of focus on millennials out there."

"We felt that the conversation about millennials was being somewhat dictated by a set of clichés that really didn't seem to bear any scrutiny when we thought about the millennials that we know already consume our product."

In an interview with Adweek following New York's Advertising Week panel titled "The Millennial Mirage", Blunden said research suggests a high ratio of those in the 18-35 age range aren't the lazy, narcissistic, entitled, apathetic parental leeches they're often described as. Rather they're often active, interested and entrepreneurial.

"They curate, they consume and they create. And that's what makes them influencers," Blunden said. "They don't just take on broad information, they DJ with it. They remix it and send it out."

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6726



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