122 Marketing Trends found for Regulation


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Consumers Seek Greater Data Security And Privacy From Brands

Trend Summary: Consumers want brands to take a stand on data security, privacy and diversity.


New research from global PR and digital marketing agency Fleishman Hillard Fishburn reveals that the ...

 

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2018]

... issues consumers truly care about are data security and privacy, whilst looking to brands for more robust leadership and delivery of social values.

Read the original unabridged The Drum.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: The Drum.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7516

EU Moves to Control US Tech Titans

Trend Summary: The European Union is girding its loins to rein in tech giants via copyright legislation.


The EU move is already sparking fierce debate, raising questions as to whether the proposed law will accomplish its goals. The fight already ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2018]

... pits major publishers, music companies and movie directors against the internet giants, among them Facebook Inc and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, as well as open-internet advocates and some small publishers.

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7473

New EU Legislation Set to Affect HR Teams

Trend Summary: The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation Act [GDPR] which takes effect in May 2018 will be critical for HR Teams.  


Human Resources - specifically the departments responsible for managing resources related to company employees - will shortly be required to cope with the European Union's looming ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2018]

...  General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR] which will take effect in May 2018.

It’s fair to say that legislation has failed to keep pace with the speed at which technology and big data has advanced – particularly the ability of a company to gather, store and analyse data.

GDPR is specifically intended to enhance data protection and the right of EU citizens to privacy, giving them greater control over their personal data and its use by marketers.

The new Act represents a complete overhaul of the legal requirements that must be met by any company handling EU citizens’ personal data – and that also includes employees’ personal data.

The implications of GDPR are not to be sneezed at. Companies who fall foul of the regulation and are found to be misusing personal information face stiff fines of up to €20m or 4% of annual worldwide turnover, whichever is the greater of the two.

Read the original unabridged Forbes.com article.

 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Forbes.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7369

EU Puts the Squeeze on Tax Avoiding US Tech Titans

Trend Summary: The EU announced yesterday its intention to rein-in the alleged tax evasion excesses of US tech giants.


The European Union this week revealed that Apple Inc owes approximately €13bn [$14.5bn] in what it politely calls "uncollected taxes" over the past decade. The move represents a new high-water mark in the bloc’s efforts to rein in the ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... alleged tax-evasive excesses of American tech giants.

The EU's move is just the first shot in what is expected to be a busy autumn for European officials, who are pushing forward a raft of regulations and investigations aimed at altering the behavior of a cadre of US-based internet superpowers. The moves are supported by a host of players—from EU regulators in Brussels to a bevy of national authorities across the continent. They are targeting areas ranging from personal privacy to anti-competition issues.

In coming weeks, EU bodies plan to debate new telecom rules that could expand to cover services like WhatsApp, proposed legislation to push news aggregators to pay newspapers for showing snippets of content, and potential audiovisual rules that would force companies like Netflix Inc to finance European movies.

At the same time, authorities in capitals like Brussels, Paris and Berlin are pursuing investigations involving big companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook, concerning alleged tax avoidance, anticompetitive behavior and privacy concerns.

“It’s an avalanche coming,” says James Waterworth, vice president for Europe at the US-based Computer & Communications Industry Association, a lobby group that represents Amazon, Facebook, Google and Netflix. “There’s a political sense from some camps that these big, extraterritorial companies are getting away with things that need to be addressed.”

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.


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Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6969

US Senators Demand Action On Ad-Click Fraud

Trend Summary: Two US Democrat Senators are demanding assurances from the Federal Trade Commission that action be taken to eliminate ad-click fraud.


In a letter to the Federal Trade Commission [FTC], Democrat Senators Chuck Schumer and Mark Warner seek assurances about programs that enable hackers to seize control of multiple computers remotely, providing them with access to consumers' ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... personal information.

Messrs Schumer and Warner specifically request the FTC to provide details on what it's doing to crack down on ad-click fraud.

Say the duo: "These programs allow hackers to seize control of multiple computers remotely, providing them access to personal information as well as the ability to remotely install malware to engage in advertising fraud, entirely unbeknownst to the computer's true owner".

Internet advertising revenues in 2015 were estimated at $59.6bn - but say the duo "many of the purchased ads are not reaching their intended audience, instead, they are being intercepted by botnets".

Maintain Schumer and Warner: "Bots plague the digital advertising space by creating fake consumer traffic, artificially driving up the cost of advertising in the same way human fraudsters can manipulate the price of a stock by creating artificial trading volume."

Last month, the World Federation of Advertisers predicted that by 2025, fake Internet traffic schemes will be second only to the cocaine and opiate markets as a form of organised crime.

Read the original unabridged Foxbusiness.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: www.foxbusiness.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6930

Marketers "Complacent" About Ad Fraud

Trend Summary: Advertisers can't afford to continue their current complacent approach to ad fraud, warns ad trade body.


According to the World Federation of Advertisers [WFA] marketers cannot afford to continue their current "complacent" approach to ad fraud, given that they are the only real casualties in what the trade body warns could be a ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... $50bn a year industry by 2025.

Says Stephan Loerke, ceo of the WFA, "Advertisers are the sole victim of ad fraud. It is endemic and it has to stop".

Loerke believes that's because agencies, vendors and media owners still benefit, albeit unintentionally, from fees and commission when fraud occurs.

He cites "a degree of complacency" among advertisers and cautions that "If brand owners don't take action, we can't expect others to do so on our behalf".

His remarks coincided with the launch of the WFA's new guidelines to help marketers reduce their exposure to ad fraud, while at the same time acknowledging that they are unlikely to eliminate it completely.

The report identifies four key areas, including people and technology, education and communication, standards, and governance.

Brands need to develop in-house expertise to support vendor selection, it recommended, and they should work with cyber-security partners to help understand common threats and demand full transparency of investment.

Brands should also set clear expectations of what they demand from their partners and set metrics that relate back to business outcomes.

Read the original unabridged Warc.com article.


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Source: Warc.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6903

Marketers Lobby for Global Ad Watchdog

Trend Summary:  The creation of a global advertising watchdog is under consideration.


Global trade association, the World Federation of Advertisers [WFA], has proposed the formation of an international  advertising watchdog to regulate internet ads as a means of countering the proliferating ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... growth of ad blocking software.

The WFA, which represents marketers at major brands who collectively represent circa 90% of global adspend, made the announcement in response to recent research into ad blocking on mobiles.

According to a new study by ad blocking solutions company PageFair there are at least 419 million people worldwide blocking ads on their smartphones.

The WFA has responded to PageFair's findings by attributing the growth of ad blocking technology to consumers who lose patience with online ads. A solution to the problem, the WFA suggests, is better quality ads.

The trade body also proposes that all representative parties in the advertising chain - marketers, publishers and ad tech companies - form a global coalition to regulate ads.

Commenting on the news of the proposal, Jed Hallam, head of digital strategy at WPP Group's media arm Mindshare, said: “The WFA should be applauded for its proposed creation of a global advertising watchdog”.

He warned, however, there are “some gaps in the WFA's proposition which need to be addressed.

According to Mr Hallam: “Firstly, at the end of every ad is a human, so the interests of consumers need to be represented in order to cater to their needs and wants. Secondly distribution isn’t the only concern with online advertising – content also needs to be improved. People don’t block ads solely because they’re invasive or high frequency, they also block them because they are annoying and contain what they deem to be irrelevant content.”

Read the original unabridged TheDrum.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: TheDrum.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6900

Adland Slammed by Mothers Union for Commercialisation of Childhood

Trend Summary: In what might prove a serious blow to the UK's ad industry, Mothers' Union has publicly condemned the commercialisation of childhood.


Earlier this week the UK branch of Mothers’ Union asked members of the General Synod of The Church of England to heed concerns voiced by parents about the impact of advertising and commercialism on children and the consequent ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2015 onward]

... well-being of the family.

In a debate chaired by the Rt Revd David Thomson, Bishop of Huntingdon, Mothers’ Union [MU] raised awareness of their Bye Buy Childhood campaign and called upon the Lords Spiritual to raise in Parliament the recommendations drafted by MU based on its recent research.

According to Rachel Aston, Social Policy Manager at MU: “Despite significant progress since our original research in 2010, we know that only 50% of parents feel equipped to manage the significant influence of advertising and the commercial world on their family."

"We want to ensure that parents are empowered to manage the impact of commercialisation, and that government continues to ensure that regulation is working and that industry follows the spirit, as well as the letter of the law when marketing and selling to children.”

Ian Barber, Director of Communications for the Advertising Association, represented the ad industry at the event. He assured those present: “When it comes to children’s well-being, everybody must be ready to play their part.

"The Mother’s Union has inspired a positive debate in our sector and UK advertising is committed to ensuring that marketing to children continues to be responsible and appropriate. Industry initiatives like Media Smart, created to help teachers and parents talk to children about advertising, are a great example of how we can make a real difference.”

Read the original unabridged AnglicanNews.org article.


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Source: AnglicanNews.org
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6674

EU Commission Launches Probe into Practices of Online Giants

Trend Summary: Following the EU’s announcement of it’s new digital strategy, US online giants such as Google and Amazon could face an anti-trust probe. 


The announcement coincides with the European Commission’s presentation of its new digital strategy and the launch of an enquiry into the trade bloc’s e-commerce sector. Primary candidates for scrutiny are internet titans Google, Amazon and Facebook, especially the manner in which they have …  

[Estimated timeframe:Q2 2015 onward]

... used their influence and power in the European market.

The outcome of the probe will determine whether these companies have to be regulated more tightly. 

The inquiry will focus on the transparency of search results and pricing policies, how online platforms use the data they obain, their relationships with other businesses and how they promote their own services to the potential disadvantage of competitors.

The investigation was announced as part of the EU's Digital Single Markets Strategy, unveiled earlier this week by Commission Vice President Andrus Ansip.

According to Mr Ansip, the strategy will "prepare Europe to reap the benefits of a digital future" and "give people and companies the online freedoms to profit fully from Europe's huge internal market."

The proposals were welcomed by European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker.

Read the original unabridged DeutscheWelle.com article. 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: DeutscheWelle.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6593

EU to Curb Google's Advertising Dominance

Trend Summary: European Union regulators clamp down on Google, Facebook and other US invaders of personal privacy.


Last week Google became the latest (and arguably the hardest hit) of major US online businesses trading within the European Union, following the latter's decision to investigate Larry, Sergei and Eric's monolithic monster on allegations of anti-trust practices, specifically its ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2015 onward]

... favouring, to the detriment of rivals, of Google's own web properties in search results .

Another of Google's current practices under investigation by the EU is the delivery of instant product reviews, thereby diverting traffic away from rivals such as Yelp.

According to an article by Garrett Sloane in today's AdWeek.com, punitive action by the EU could force Google to change its search tactics. Additionally, the probe could also veer into other aspects of its business that impact upon advertising.

Back in 2013, when the US Federal Trade Commission conducted a full investigation into Google's alleged business practices, the commissioners declined to label Google a search monopoly whilst, nevertheless, continuing to maintain a close watch on the company's commercial behaviour. 

Said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz: “The changes Google has agreed to make will ensure that consumers continue to reap the benefits of competition in the online marketplace and in the market for innovative wireless devices they enjoy.”

It appears that the EU is now adopting a similar stance.

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: https://marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6568



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